Media Coverage

Office dogs, yoga classes, good pay — welcome to the modern Mass. factory

After a prolonged period of little or no growth in the manufacturing industry, Massachusetts — one of the country’s original powerhouses — is reasserting itself as a leader in what is known as advanced manufacturing, selling products that are transforming the industry nationwide. Innovation helped drive production output in the state to a record $50 billion last year and boost employment by 1,700 jobs in the first quarter, the biggest year-over-year increase since 2000-2001.

The high-end parts Massachusetts manufacturers make are often hidden inside other products — shafts for machines that create flu vaccines, lens housings for night-vision goggles, sensors for submarines — as well as in robotics that manufacturers increasingly rely on to automate their processes. And this upscale niche has contributed to the state’s manufacturing strength, whereas production of some lower-value items has shrunk or moved overseas, said Branner Stewart, a senior research manager at the University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute.

“We’re kind of like Japan or Germany, where we’re competitive in very high-value-added, technologically advanced goods, as opposed to China, which, though advancing quickly, is better known for mass-produced goods,” Stewart said.

WRKO Boston also interviewed Branner in depth about manufacturing trends in the commonwealth

Read article:

Go Back

Contracting with Us

The UMass Donahue Institute is pre-approved to offer a variety of options for streamlined, simplified contracting both within Massachusetts and at the federal level.

Learn More

UMass Donahue Institute

University of Massachusetts

Office of the President

100 Venture Way, Suite 9

Hadley, Massachusetts 01035

(413) 545-0001

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Related Links

Receive our Newsletter


Connect with Us