Massachusetts Population Estimates Program

State Population Estimates

The U.S. Census Bureau annually develops state-level population and components-of-change estimates. The latest vintage was released on December 19, 2018 for population as of July 1, 2018. According to the new release, the Massachusetts population increased by an estimated 38,903 persons from July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018 to a new total of 6,902,149.

The sections below examine Massachusetts population change compared to other states and regions; change since 2000; components of population change, including births, deaths, and migration in the past year and since 2000; and how these components compare to other Northeast states and U.S. regions. 

For more information on county and sub-county level estimates for Massachusetts, please see our county population and city/town population pages.

Latest State Estimate Summary
On December 19, 2018, the U.S. Census Bureau released population estimates and estimated components of change for the nation, states, and Puerto Rico for the years 2010-2018. For a summary and highlights of the 2018 estimates for Massachusetts, download the UMDI Summary Report.

Massachusetts ranks as the 15th most populous state in the U.S. with an estimated population of 6,902,149 as of July 1, 2018. From July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018, the state population increased by an estimated 38,903 persons or 0.57%. This annual percentage change indicates that Massachusetts’ growth rate is approximately 8 times that of the Northeast average of 0.07%, and ranks it as the fastest growing state in New England and the Northeast both in terms of percentage and numeric increase. 

At the national level, Massachusetts ranked 16th for annual population change this year, and ranked 22nd in terms of annual percentage growth in the 2017 to 2018 period, up from 24th last year. Since the last Census in April of 2010, the Massachusetts population has increased by 354,359 persons cumulatively, or 5.4%, compared to a 1.4% cumulative increase for the Northeast region and a 6.0% cumulative increase for the U.S. as a whole. Table 1 below shows both the numeric and percentage growth and rankings for the United States, U.S. regions, and the Northeast states including Massachusetts for the period April 1, 2010, July 1, 2017, and July 1, 2018.

Massachusetts’ cumulative population increase of 5.4% is somewhat behind the national 6.0% increase since 2010, though its single year percentage of 0.57% is getting closer to the U.S. average of 0.62%. Massachusetts also continues to increase in population at a much faster rate than the Northeast and Midwest regions on average, which grew by just 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively, from 2017 to 2018. The Southern and Western regions meanwhile continue to lead the U.S. in terms of percentage growth, at about 0.9% each over the last year (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Annual Percent Change in Population 2010-2018 for the United States, Regions, and Massachusetts

Figure description.

Annual change in population.

Citation: UMass Donahue Institute. Source data: NST-EST2017-01. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. December 19, 2018.

The map below (Figure 2) clearly demonstrates that Massachusetts stands apart from the rest of the Northeastern and Midwestern states in terms of overall percentage growth since 2010, and even surpasses some states in the South and West. The single-year percent change map (Figure 3) for the most recent 2017-2018 period also puts Massachusetts ahead of most other Northeast States.

Figure 2. Estimated Cumulative Change in Population by U.S. State, Census 2010 to July 1, 2018

Figure description.

Estimated Cumulative Change in Population by U.S. State, Census 2010 to July 1, 2017

Source: UMass Donahue Institute. Cumulative Estimates of the Resident Population Change for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. Release Date: December 19, 2018.

Figure 3. Estimated Percent Change in Population by U.S. State, July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018

Figure description.

Estimated Percent Change in Population by U.S. State, July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017

Source: UMass Donahue Institute Annual Estimates of the Resident Population Change for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. Release Date: December 19, 2018

Massachusetts has been growing twice as fast this decade compared to last. From 2001 to 2004, Massachusetts’ growth rates, along with the Northeast rates, were actually declining, and only turned around after 2005, due in part to a reversal of domestic out-migration. Starting in 2007, the Massachusetts annual growth rate overtook the Northeast rate, at 0.5% for Massachusetts compared to 0.3% for the Northeast for that year, and the state’s annual percentage growth has remained above the Northeast average since that time.

From Census 2000 to Census 2010, the average growth for Massachusetts was about 0.3% per year, with an average population increase of just 19,852 per year. Since the 2010 Census, Massachusetts has increased its population by an average of 43,036 persons per year, or 0.7%, per year. Cumulatively from 2000 to 2010, Massachusetts’ population increased by 198,516 — or 3.1% total. Since Census 2010, Massachusetts’ population has already increased by 354,359, or 5.4% cumulatively.

Figure 4: Massachusetts Annual % Growth Over Previous Year 2001-2018

Figure description.

Massachusetts Annual % Growth Over Previous Year 2001-2017

UMass Donahue Institute. Source Data: Intercensal Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2010 (ST-EST00INT-01). Release Date: September 2011 and Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 (NST-EST2018-01) Release Date: December 2018. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division.

The U.S. Census Bureau produces revised population estimates each year by adding updated components of change to the Census 2010 base. These components include both the number of births and deaths, which together constitute the natural increase. They also include net domestic migration (migration to and from other states within the U.S.) and net international migration (migration to and from other countries) which sum to the total net migration. A fifth component, the group quarters population, is factored into the estimates base for the previous year, but is not broken out as a separate number in the Bureau’s published release.

According to the U.S. Census estimates, from July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018 Massachusetts experienced 70,297 births and 58,506 deaths, for a net natural increase of 11,791. At the same time, Massachusetts experienced a net outflow of 25,755 persons to other states in the U.S. and a net inflow of 53,013 persons from other countries, for total net migration of 27,258 persons. Figure 5 displays the extent to which a higher number of births offsets the number of deaths and how positive international migration offsets negative net domestic migration to sum to positive population change in Massachusetts during this period.

Figure 5: Massachusetts Estimated Components of Change, 2018

Figure description.

Figure 3: Massachusetts Estimated Components of Change, 2017

Source: UMass Donahue Institute. NST-EST2018-ALLDATA. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. December 2018.

Massachusetts has long experienced, to varying degrees, component patterns similar to those seen above. Figure 6 below shows the trends in these components from 2000 through 2018.

Figure 6: Massachusetts Estimated Components of Change 2000-2018

Figure description.

Massachusetts Estimated Components of Change 2000-2017

Source: UMass Donahue Institute. ST-2000-7; CO-EST2010-ALLDATA and NST-EST2018-ALLDATA. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division.

A greater number of births over deaths and positive international migration offsetting negative domestic migration have all contributed to an overall population increase this decade and last. Domestic out-migration from Massachusetts peaked in the middle of the last decade with an estimated net outflow of 55,077 persons leaving Massachusetts for other parts of the United States in 2005. This outflow was reduced significantly in 2007 (by 37%) and again in 2008 (by 63%), and then finally reversed to a positive in-flow in 2009, with an estimated 6,843 net persons moving into Massachusetts from other U.S. states. 

In the years since 2010, domestic migration reverted to a negative value again, but the outflow has been moderate compared to the peak outflow over the last decade. Births and deaths throughout the 2000-2018 period have been much less variable from year to year than migration, with births showing a slight overall decline through the years and deaths continuing at about the same level over the course of the time series.

An examination of the components-of-change data begins to answer the question of why some states or regions are racing ahead in growth while others lag behind. Massachusetts, for instance, is growing faster than any other New England or Northeastern state. The estimated components data suggest that, while Massachusetts shows a reasonable rate of natural increase compared to other Northeastern states, its total positive migration—specifically the large number of international in-migrants offsetting a relatively small number of domestic out-migrants—explains why the state leads the region in overall percent growth, as shown in Table 2 below.

Table 2. Estimated Components of Resident Population Change for the United States, Regions, and Northeast States July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018

Table description.

Geographic Area Vital Events Net Migration
Births Deaths Natural Increase International Domestic Total
United States 3,855,500 2,814,013 1,041,487 978,826 (X) 978,826
Northeast 609,336 506,909 102,427 229,700 (292,928) (63,228)
Midwest 804,431 621,030 183,401 127,583 (157,048) (29,465)
South 1,499,838 1,109,152 390,686 418,418 345,132 763,550
West 941,895 576,922 364,973 203,125 104,844 307,969
Connecticut 35,048 31,312 3,736 16,494 (21,509) (5,015)
Maine 12,438 14,079 (1,641) 570 4,469 5,039
Massachusetts 70,297 58,506 11,791 53,013 (25,755) 27,258
New Hampshire 12,149 11,935 214 2,606 3,928 6,534
New Jersey 100,226 76,370 23,856 46,660 (50,591) (3,931)
New York 227,099 165,728 61,371 70,375 (180,306) (109,931)
Pennsylvania 135,905 133,562 2,343 35,377 (20,463) 14,914
Rhode Island 10,575 9,830 745 2,755 (2,639) 116
Vermont 5,599 5,587 12 1,850 (62) 1,788

UMass Donahue Institute. Source: U.S. Census Bureau Population Division. Estimates of the Components of Resident Population Change for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018. (NST-EST2018-05) Release date: December 19, 2018.

Another way to compare this data over different geographies is to first convert it to a rate so that larger and smaller geographies can be evaluated together. Table 3 below shows the rate, per 1,000 persons, of each change component for the United States, U.S. Regions, and the Northeast States, including Massachusetts.

These estimated component rates indicate that Massachusetts births are occurring at a lower rate (10.2 per 1,000 average population) than in the United States as a whole (11.8) and each U.S. region on average. Deaths in Massachusetts are also occurring at a lower rate (8.5) than other regions of the U.S. except the West (7.4), but are almost on par with the U.S. average of 8.6. Taken together, these vital events lead to a natural increase rate (1.7) that is below that of the U.S. as a whole (3.2) and all of its regions, though very close to the Northeast average of 1.8. Note that all other states in the Northeast except for New Jersey and New York show even smaller rates of natural increase.

Within the migration component, we see that the Northeast and Midwest regions experience net domestic out-migration (-5.2 and -2.3, respectively) while the Southern and Western regions have positive domestic migration (2.8 and 1.4). The domestic migration rate of -3.7 in Massachusetts is less than the Northeast regional average of -5.2, but still indicates net domestic outmigration to Southern and Western states. On the other hand, the international migration rate of 7.7 for Massachusetts is more than double that of the U.S. as a whole (3.0) and exceeds all U.S. regional averages. As a result, Massachusetts total migration, including domestic and international, nets to a positive rate of 4.0 in-migrants per 1,000 population—higher than both the Northeast and Midwest regional averages.

According to the latest Census estimates, only Florida ranks higher than Massachusetts in its rate of annual net international immigration per 1,000 population (Table 4). In terms of numbers of net immigrants, Massachusetts ranked 5th (Table 5). As a result, Massachusetts total migration, including domestic and international, nets to a positive rate of 4.0 in-migrants per 1,000 population—higher than both the Northeast and Midwest regional averages and now on par with the Western Region average (Table 3).

Table 3. Estimated Annual Rates of the Components of Resident Population Change for the United States, Regions, and Northeast States July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018

Table description.

Geographic Area Vital Events Net Migration
Births Deaths Natural Increase International Domestic Total
United States 11.8 8.6 3.2 3.0 (X) 3.0
Northeast 10.9 9.0 1.8 4.1 (5.2) (1.1)
Midwest 11.8 9.1 2.7 1.9 (2.3) (0.4)
South 12.1 8.9 3.1 3.4 2.8 6.1
West 12.1 7.4 4.7 2.6 1.4 4.0
Connecticut 9.8 8.8 1.0 4.6 (6.0) (1.4)
Maine 9.3 10.5 (1.2) 0.4 3.3 3.8
Massachusetts 10.2 8.5 1.7 7.7 (3.7) 4.0
New Hampshire 9.0 8.8 0.2 1.9 2.9 4.8
New Jersey 11.3 8.6 2.7 5.2 (5.7) (0.4)
New York 11.6 8.5 3.1 3.6 (9.2) (5.6)
Pennsylvania 10.6 10.4 0.2 2.8 (1.6) 1.2
Rhode Island 10.0 9.3 0.7 2.6 (2.5) 0.1
Vermont 9.0 8.9 0.0 3.0 (0.1) 2.9

UMass Donahue Institute. Source: U.S. Census Bureau Population Division. Estimates of the Annual Rates of the Components of Resident Population Change for the United States, Regions, States, and Puerto Rico: July 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018. (NST-EST2018-06) Release date: December 19, 2018 Rates per 1,000 average population.

Table 4: States with the Highest Rates of Net International Immigration, 2018

Table description.

State Rate of Net Interational Immgration Ranking
Florida 8.3 1
Massachusetts 7.7 2
New Jersey 5.2 3
District of Columbia 5.1 4
Connecticut 4.6 5
South Dakota 4.2 6
Washington 4.1 7
Maryland 3.7 8
Virginia 3.7 9
Texas 3.7 10
New York 3.6 11
North Dakota 3.4 12
Alaska 3.3 13
California 3.0 14
Vermont 3.0 15

UMass Donahue Institute. Source U.S. Census Bureau Population Division NST_EST2018_ALLDATA. Release Date December 19, 2018. Rates per 1,000 average population. State rankings include District of Columbia.

Table 5. States With the Highest Net International Immigration, 2018

Table description.

State Net International Immigrants Ranking
Florida 175,670 1
California 117,797 2
Texas 104,976 3
New York 70,375 4
Massachusetts 53,013 5
New Jersey 46,660 6
Pennsylvania 35,377 7
Virginia 31,641 8
Illinois 30,735 9
Washington 30,557 10
Maryland 22,575 11
Georgia 21,786 12
Michigan 21,415 13
Ohio 20,514 14
North Carolina 20,035 15

UMass Donahue Institute. Source U.S. Census Bureau Population Division NST_EST2018_ALLDATA. Release Date December 19, 2018.

Figure 7: Rates of Estimated Components of Change by U.S. Region, 2018

Figure description.

Rates of Estimated Components of Change by U.S. Region, 2017

UMass Donahue Institute. Source Data: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, NST_EST2018_ALLDATA. Release date December 19, 2018.

Additional Information and estimates data can be found on the U.S. Census Bureau’s website.

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